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  • Bunker Sand

    £15.00

    Originating on the East coast of Scotland, early golfers hit pebbles over sand dunes. These sandy hazards to any golfers game  were initially  a purely organic landscape feature, created  by animals. Over time Bunkers were incorporated and evolved to be the dreaded feature in all golf courses throughout the world.

  • Firth of Forth Beach finds

    £15.00

    With it’s 11,602 miles (18,672 km) of coastline, accessing  Scotland’s stunning beaches, where the ice cold waters meet the roaming land, is never far out of reach.  From popular family-friendly tourist spots with their spectacular shores to remote hidden coastal gems with their nooks and crannies offering peaceful isolation.  Scotland’s beaches provide many vastly different coastal pictures, yet all are wonderfully evocative in their own rights. From  stunning silver sands and crystal clear turquoise water to pebble, driftwood and sea-glass stroon shores with their crashing waves, Scotland’s beaches offer a haven of treasures to help you while away the hours and blow the cobwebs away.

  • Glasgow Cone

    £15.00

    An unusual but light hearted addition to your Wee Piece of Scotland collection. Scottish people, have their one of a kind sense of humour.  Edinburgh has the Castle and Glasgow has a statue with a traffic cone on its head directly outside the Gallery of Modern Art.   For over 140 years the statue of the Duke of Wellingstone  was just another statue. Until one evening in 1980’s, a traffic cone mysteriously appeared on top of his head. Despite continuous  efforts to remove the cone by the local Council, the cone has remained in place for over 30 years. If the cone is removed it’s only a matter of days until a new one appears.

  • Haggis replica

    £15.00

    With it’s origin’s shrouded in mystery and its infamous association with Rabbie Burns, couple with the folklore of wild hairy rodent like creatures, with it’s mismatched legs scuttling across the hills in one direction…Haggis is one of Scotland classic symbols. In reality, this rudimental yet practical way of utilising sheep offal the content and casing of haggis may not be everyone’s first culinary choice.  If the thought of eating the original Haggis recipe leaves you feeling a bit ‘peely-wally’, the vegetarian variety is a delicious and possibly less formidable gastronomic option, together with Haggis crisps or ice cream.  Alternatively yo could always give ‘Haggis Hurling’ a go!!

  • Heather

    £15.00

    Growing freely be it high up on the moorlands or down to the sea cliffs, heather is a sturdy wee ever green tree whose delicate flowers bloom twice a year where the delicate purple flower love to dance in the wind. ‘Haeddre’, ‘Heddir’ or ‘Hathar’ as it was called in times gone casts a  glorious purple hue as far as the eye can see.   Not just a pretty face on the landscape heather is used  in medicines, teas, roof thatching, honey production,scents, jewellery, beers and so much more.  Plain and simply put, the much loved heather is ‘Braw’ (excellent)

  • Highland Games Caber

    £15.00

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  • Nessie

    £15.00

    Captured within this Wee Piece of Scotland bottle is a lovingly handmade wee Nessie.  This Nessie may not be as terrifying as coming face to face with the real thing…we’ve added a smile to her face…so’s not to scare the bairns!!!

     

  • Oatmeal

    £15.00

    Scottish parritch (porridge) is synonymous with our country and has been for many a century. Since late medieval times oats have been part of the Scot’s staple diet.  With it’s many traditions and superstitions this oaty concoction….. Scottish porridge should be made stirred with a wooden stick (known a Spurtle).  It should always be stirred clockwise with your right hand and should be eaten from a wooden bowl whilst standing up. In times gone by, porridge would be cooked up in a big pot then poured into ‘drawers’ and allowed to cool, then sliced so it could be eaten throught the day.  It could be said the Scots and our porridge invented the first take away meal!!.  If you disagree ‘save yer breath tae cool yer parritch’ (hold your tongue or simply say nothing)

  • Romantic Scotland

    £15.00

    Since the days of eloping to Gretna Green, Scotland has been synonymous with romance.  Young couples slipping away together, crossing the Scottish border, where the convenient Blacksmith Shop offered the perfect wedding venue for love struck runaways. The hammering of the ‘Old Smithy’s’ anvil  romantically signifies the forging of couples together in the heat of the moment, binding them together for eternity.    With its historic romantic tales, together with a wealth of ancient  castles, remote wilderness, dramatic landscapes and warm welcomes,  Scotland truly does capture romance in its very own uniquely magical way.

  • Shetland Peat

    £15.00

    Peat, may look less than exciting, but it’s worth it’s weight in gold.  Formed from organic matter (mostly plant based)which has laid untouched for thousands of years in land water-logged from the melting glaciers of the Ice age, peat truly is a botanical timecapsule. Not only was Peat  one of the most commonly used fuels many Scottish  island dwellers used to heat their homes, it is also  what gives some whiskey a smoky flavour and the reason behind why the water of  Loch Ness is so very dark. Not only that…It’s an incredibly important natural ally in the fight against climate change.  As 20% of Scotland’s land is peatland….it truly an often underrated ‘Gem of Scotland’

  • Shetland Sheep’s Wool

    £15.00

    In Scotland there are  6.6 million sheep and 5.3 million people at the last count (give or take).  The most commonly found sheep is the blackfaced, with it’s  course, tough wool. In Scotland the Ram (male) is called a Tup and the Ewe (female) is called a Girn.  Sheep can be found grazing throughout Scotland , often in the highlands and islands these wooly walking clouds  can be found strolling in front of cars on unfenced roads and giving you that look that says ‘Awa an bile yer heid’  (translating into ‘get lost’)

  • Tartan

    £15.00

    Before we start..tartan and Plaid are not the same!!  :) The criss cross patterned fabric known worldwide as ‘Plaid’ is only transforms into ‘Tartan’ when the plaid patterned fabric is associated to a particular name, a specific clan, family, or other community.  Without this association the plaid is nothing more than a pretty patterned fabric, maybe used as a shawl or bedcover.  Simply put…’No alliance, means, it’s No tartan!!’

  • Unicorn Horn

    £15.00

    It true: the unicorn really is the official national animal of Scotland.

    This untameable, proud white horse-like creature with it’s golden spiralling horn is considered one of the most iconic symbols of Scotland.  It even has it’s own national day on the 9th of April!! It’s a  a fiercely independent  beast notoriously difficult to seize and conquer.  The unicorn, to the Scots, is a symbol of purity, innocence and power. Legend has it, such is the strength of the healing power held within their golden  horn, the unicorn can purify even the most poisoned of waters.The unicorn was first used on the Scottish royal coat of arms in the 12th century.  The perfect representation of the pride, strength and other-worldly qualtities  that the Scots possessed  to remain unconquered…or at the least remain that wee big magical and legendary.

  • Whisky

    £15.00

    Before we start..tartan and Plaid are not the same!!  :) The criss cross patterned fabric known worldwide as ‘Plaid’ is only transforms into ‘Tartan’ when the plaid patterned fabric is associated to a particular name, a specific clan, family, or other community.  Without this association the plaid is nothing more than a pretty patterned fabric, maybe used as a shawl or bedcover.  Simply put…’No alliance, means, it’s No tartan!!’

  • Wild Thistle

    £15.00

    For over 500 years the thistle has been one of the most important symbols of Scotland. Legend has it this hardy, spike filled plant saved Scots warriors from potential ambuse from an invading Norse army.  Many say the magnificent thistle is a weed…we prefer to see it as a strong, free spirited flower which is hardy, resilient and persistent…after all ‘beauty is in the eye of the beholder’

    Captured within this  Wee Piece of Scotland bottle is a hand picked, dried and bottled thistle head.(and yes they do hurt when foraging for them!!)  This thistle is a hardy symbol of resilience,  devotion, bravery, determination, and strength. Where one person sees a  weed ,  another view a flower.  In other words as the Scot’s say ‘We’re a’ Jock Tamson’s bairns!’  (We’re all God’s creations, nobody is better than anybody else – we’re all equal.)

  • Wishes

    £15.00

    An alternative ‘flower of Scotland’ can be found in the spring dandelion.  The curse for many a keen gardener, but truly a beautiful flowering plant which has three phases to it’s growth.  The three phases represent the sun, moon and stars. The yellow flower represents the sun, the white puff ball represents the moon and the dispersing seeds represent the stars. So when we blow the seeds to make a wish…we are wish on the stars.Many people believe that dandelion seeds will carry your thoughts and dreams to loved ones when you blow them into the air.